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Author Topic: House Robbery Soars - From IOL  (Read 1310 times)

Offline El

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House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« on: September 08, 2008, 06:22:56 am »
House robberies soar

    September 07 2008 at 09:31AM

By Mary Corrigall

The reign of terror unleashed on South Africans in their homes by gangs of armed thugs is worsening dramatically.

Residential robbery is up by 14,5 percent nationally, according to the police's 2007-2008 crime statistics.

Based on these figures, every day almost 40 homes are invaded by armed robbers.

And it is not only robberies that are threatening the sanctity of the home. Sixty-eight percent of hijackings happen in driveways, according to Richard Brussow, a former policeman who runs the National Hijack Prevention Academy.

The 2007-2008 police statistics show that the frequency of car hijacking has increased by 4,4 percent and that there has also been a spike in business robberies, the frequency of which has gone up by 47,4 percent.


These figures prove that crime threatens almost everyone, at whatever level of society, in this country.

"The annual increase in the rate of house robberies poses an immense threat to our personal security," Dr Johan Burger, a senior researcher for the crime, justice and politics programme at the Institute for Security Studies, told The Sunday Independent.

"We are under siege."

Residential robbery is differentiated from residential burglary in that it is classified as a crime in which armed individuals enter a private residence by force with the intent to rob.

An example of this was last week's horrific attack in Meyersdal, south of Johannesburg, in which a couple's daughter was gang-raped and both parents were shot and wounded by the police, who mistook them for the robbers.

Residential robbery is a relatively new category of crime, listed separately in the police's crime statistics for the first time in 2002.

"It used to be a sub-category of aggravated robbery. It was smallscale when it started out. But as this type crime grew it began to attract the attention of the police, and the need to record it as a separate crime type became a necessity," said Burger.

During the first year residential robbery was defined, 9 063 cases were recorded and since then the figure has grown steadily, with 14 481 incidents logged for 2007-2008.

"Business robberies have also increased, so when you are at work you are also at risk. Shopping malls and restaurants are all places of work, which means that you are never safe," said Burger.

For those who can afford it, the fight-back is under way.

People are retaliating with state-of-the-art security systems that incorporate lasers and cameras, armed guards outside their homes, by joining community associations and community policing forums, and by setting up websites that monitor and report on robberies in the neighbourhood.

eBlockwatch is one of the largest crime-fighting community networks in the country. It has 60 458 members, according to its founder, Andre Snyman.

Profiles of criminals are posted on the website and information is shared among community members by SMS and on the internet. The information generated by the system is passed on to the police and has led to arrests and convictions, said Snyman.

However, according to the Institute for Security Studies' 2007 victim survey, 60 percent of South Africans do nothing to protect themselves against crime and only 20 percent have attended a meeting of a community policing forum.

But Burger said there was little citizens could do to curb residential robbery.

"Research shows that robbers are highly organised. They use their own transport and acquire the services of people working at security companies and in government departments before they target your home."

The state's response to residential robbery has been very slow, according to Burger.

"The arrest and conviction rate for this crime is low - criminals aren't scared. The chance of getting away with this kind of crime is very high," he said.

In Gauteng, where the incidence of residential robbery is the highest in the country, intensified policing initiatives, such as Operation Iron Fist and Operation Trio, have been introduced over the past few years.

Though they have had some effect, bringing the number of house robberies in the province down by 5,4 percent, the incidence remains high.

"What is 5 percent? Let's say there are 10 robberies in one community - that community is going to be living in terror. All it takes is one tragedy," said Firoz Cachalia, Gauteng's MEC for community safety.

Cachalia said that having an efficient police force was insufficient if the entire criminal justice system was ineffective.

"Our arrest rates were increasing but not our conviction rates: we were getting the police to be more effective but we weren't taking [criminals] out of the system, which is really what counts."

          o This article was originally published on page 1 of Sunday Independent on September 07, 2008



Offline Bevmac

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2008, 07:53:31 am »
We have seen a marked increase in this in our small rural town in the freestate, there have been a number of attacks on people in their homes here, we thought we were "relatively" safe here in the sticks, but slowly they are closing in all over  :confused:.

Im poop bang at night especially, cant wait to get to NZ!!!

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2008, 07:53:31 am »

Offline soniag

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2008, 03:21:35 pm »
Yip...def closing in on smaller towns now...Not as Lekker as what it used to be.  Here in our small Northwest town there was a sindicate coming through here a while ago, and several houses was broken in to, but nobody was hurt.  And a few cars was stolen.  Only thing is they poisend the dogs, and our vet was trying to save the poor creatures the whole weekend and week.
You cannot control what life brings your way. But what you do with it is up to you.

Offline SaKiwiBoer

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2008, 09:50:33 am »
"The annual increase in the rate of house robberies poses an immense threat to our personal security," Dr Johan Burger, a senior researcher for the crime, justice and politics programme at the Institute for Security Studies, told The Sunday Independent.

"We are under siege."

No kidding, my 7 year old could have told him that.......  ::)  ;D  :2funny:  Idiots, C-ya, SAKB.
21/03/2007-EOI submitted
18/07/2007-Selected from the Pool
07/03/2008-Receive ITA
15/05/2008-ITA Submitted-(hou duim vas)
11/12/2008-PR GRANTED-(thanx a lot!!!)

"Those who desire to give up freedom in order to gain security, will not have, nor do they deserve, either one." (Benjamin Franklin)

Offline soniag

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2008, 04:47:28 pm »
Dit is die hele probleem hier.  Almal weet daar is 'n probleem 'n M/se probleem for that matter maar "the powers that be" doen niks daaraan nie.  Nee wat hulle versoek liewer die publiek om die probleempie vir hulle op te los, en gebruik bekendes en die Huisgenoot/You om mense 'n morele plig te laat voel dat dit eitnlik ons verantwoordelikheid is om die diewens en boewens uit ons lewens te kry en te hou.

Maar belasting moet ons betaal...en tv lisensies moet ons betaal....en wat kry jy vir jou geld?

 :censored: :cursing:  niks...net ministers wat al hoe vetter word.......
You cannot control what life brings your way. But what you do with it is up to you.

Offline SaKiwiBoer

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2008, 06:01:59 pm »
En dan as jy iets daaraan doen, soos as jy terug baklei, is dit verkeerd, en as jy terug skiet, is dit ook verkeerd. Nou wat wil hulle he moet julle doen?  :idiot2:   :crazy2:   :idiot2:  Idiots !! Cheers SAKB.
21/03/2007-EOI submitted
18/07/2007-Selected from the Pool
07/03/2008-Receive ITA
15/05/2008-ITA Submitted-(hou duim vas)
11/12/2008-PR GRANTED-(thanx a lot!!!)

"Those who desire to give up freedom in order to gain security, will not have, nor do they deserve, either one." (Benjamin Franklin)

Offline Parra

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2008, 11:28:32 am »
I found this article online.....just 400 more reasons to leave

____________________________________________________________________

How safe are you in SA?
 
South Africans could be forgiven if they consider themselves to be a bit safer after the police crime statistics indicated that violent crime have dropped somewhat. At least it sounds better to punch-drunk people fed up with crimes like rape, murder, attempted murder, assault and indecent assault.
In the beautiful Western Cape crime on the whole did declined marginally although drug-related crimes and house robberies increased as well as the ever present drunken driving incidents.
Brazen use of brute force saw several Atlantic seafront houses smashed open in broad daylight during June and July. Ignoring blaring burglar alarms and security systems, gangs simply stormed the houses, ripped off security doors, smashed open front or back doors and broke out any safes and other valuables and escaping  well before any armed reaction patrols or the police could arrive.

Police have stepped up preventative measures and warned against the new forms of violence displayed by criminals. Indeed, the Western Cape is still home to the country's murder capital, Nyanga, while several other suburbs and places in the province suffer badly from crime.
There was a sharp increase in crimes against businesses, both nationally and provincially, particularly small enterprises. ATM bombings increased and ordinary householders experienced more robberies and hijackings.

A bit more positive was the overall drop of 6,4% in contact crimes, about one third of all recorded serious crimes in 2007/08.

The contact crimes include common robbery (down 9,5%), attempted murder (down 7,5%), robbery with aggravating circumstances (down 7,4%), common assault (down 6,6%), murder (down 4,7%), assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm (down 4,6 %) and indecent assault (down 2,1%).

But this is where the good news ends. Many other types of crime increased significantly.

Burglaries and break-ins to homes without a confrontation, did go down by almost 5% but violent armed robberies shot up by more than 13%.

The scourge of cash-in-transit heists went down by 15,4% thanks to "concerted police action". It was suspected that some of the syndicates might have shifted attention to ATM bombings, which escalated dramatically.

There were 12 bombings in 2005, increasing to a projected total of 538 for 2008.

The police have also conceded that they were not winning the battle against the so-called trio crimes (house robbery, carjacking and business robbery), which have consistently increased over the past three years "despite various focused initiatives to counter them during 2006 and 2007".

Robberies at mainly business premises skyrocketed by about 48% and truck hijackings went up by 40%.

According to the report, residential robberies are usually committed between 9pm and 3am (55%) by "small groups of unemployed youths" who invariably surprise their victims inside their homes.

While car or motorcycle theft is down 7% and theft from vehicles down 10%, carjacking went up by more than 4% - actually, 70% of all carjackings happens at either the owner's gates or in their driveways.

Sexual crimes continue to present authorities with a statistical nightmare with rape and indecent assault among the most under-reported categories of crime.
Lawlessness among citizens has also contributed to the rise in some crime categories.

The number of road users caught driving under the influence of alcohol increased by over 25% and over 4% more drug-related offences occurred. It is actually a case of better policing as more offenders were being caught.

The report notes a high correlation between substance abuse and crime in general.

"People under the influence of drugs and alcohol may become aggressive and start arguments, which could turn into physical confrontations resulting in assault, rape, attempted murder or murder," the report warns.

It points out that drugs can be an expensive habit that drives people to commit property-related crimes and concludes that "drugs are the primary substance fuelling organised crime and causing turf wars among gangs".

Syndicates often enjoyed the protection of the communities - especially in informal settlements - from which they operated.

Conditions of life within the settlements have given rise to a sub-culture of tolerance to crime where space is given to criminals to commit crime willy-nilly in those and other areas.

The criminals also buy silence from some residents who either co-operate out of fear or because they gain from some of the criminal activities.

Business-related crime is on the increase as burglary at non-residential premises rose by 6.8%, commercial crime went up by 4.8% and shoplifting rose by 1.3%.
The actual raw number of robberies at business premises went up by a massive 47.4% - from 6 689 to 9 862.
Commissioner Chris de Kock said most of these robberies are from small business premises with no or very little security and which accumulate comparatively large amounts of cash.
Bank robberies increased, but the numbers are still very small, going up from 129 to 144. Cash in transit robberies fell by 15.4% as the organisers - and it is a highly organised crime - turned their attention elsewhere.
Street robbery is now showing a clear downward trend. In 2003 to 2004, the number of street robberies reported was 105 690. Last year it fell from 92 021 to 78 117.
 
____________________________________________________________________________

I also wonder if they took into account that we are not bothered to report rape, robberies, break-ins any more since they do nothing about it ?



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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2008, 11:28:32 am »

Offline ANTONK

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2008, 07:03:41 pm »
Agree 101% Parra - GET OUT OF HERE QUICKLY  O0

Offline Didi77

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Re: House Robbery Soars - From IOL
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2008, 10:42:13 am »
Please keep my family safe  :'(