Advice and Support for South Africans Immigrating to New Zealand

South Africans Going To New Zealand

Author Topic: New Zealand is Not Paradise  (Read 3481 times)

Offline 2GatJakkals

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2013, 12:40:17 pm »
I had good reason for wanting to leave South Africa, like most others, I suppose. And I had a clear picture of what I hoped to find in New Zealand.

I can honestly say that I did find it, and that the move was worth it.  But I can not honestly say that I never miss the life or the people I left behind.  Or that I do not long for a hardekoolkampvuur and the night sounds of Africa.

It would be unrealistic to expect otherwise, which is what I think Vulpes' point is.
EOI selected Sept 2011, ITA received Oct 2011, ITA submitted 23 Feb 2012.
Job offer received 10 Apr 2012, Applied for WP 16 Apr 2012, WP issued 24 May 2012, Wife started working in Wellington 1 June 2012.
PR approved 18 July 2012, House in Pretoria sold Oct 2012, Arrived in NZ 1 Dec 2012

Offline yusuf

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 10:29:49 pm »
2GatJakkals, well said.
DIY Residence Application - Roughly 18 months
Arrived in Wellington with Residence - 1st May 2013
Relocated to Auckland - 24th May 2015
PR Approved - 19th Nov 2015

SA Going to NZ Advice Forum

Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 10:29:49 pm »

Offline vulpes

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2013, 11:40:04 pm »
2gatjakkals, exactly

I think that people tell themselves that the missing things part of immigration won't feel so bad because of all the things they gain.

'Oh i know i will miss my family, but my kids freedom makes it worth it' Well yes, of course it's better here. But you can feel good about one thing and still feel terrible about something else! The good parts don't cancel out the bad. If you see what I mean. They exist together.

Having a great job, or loving your new country doesn't neccessarily make the hard stuff any easier at all. Understanding that, and being prepared for it, means that when you feel that way you can deal with it better.
23/08/2010 EOI Submitted
25/08/2010 EOI Selected
10/09/2010 EOI Selection Rescinded
23/05/2010 EOI Re Selected
06/06/2011 ITA Received
27/11/2011 ITA Submitted
10/12/2011 ITA Rejected
16/03/2012 ITA ReSubmitted
11/05/2012 CO Assigned
14/09/2012 Phone Interview
26/10/2012 PR Approved
15/02/2013 In NZ

Offline addywads

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2013, 11:51:48 pm »
Some people think paradise is on an Island with a lovely blond. What do you talk about after the first week. No TV, no books, no intellectual stimulation I would be bored after 2 weeks.
Regards,
Peter W

All the blondes (myself included) are coming for you Peter Jepwood  :knuppel2:
Life is too short for regrets.

Offline Sherelee

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2013, 12:13:35 am »

I'm a brunette and I deserve to be on that island too  :tickedoff:

Oh wait a minute, I am on an island and the best one at that  :yippee:


Offline Adviser

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2013, 05:59:51 am »
As long as I am not that blond one  :2funny:
I am a licensed immigration adviser in real life. I do love what I do and how I do it. Peace!!!

Offline Jenvr

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2013, 07:06:28 am »
Thank you so SO much for your post. Coming to terms with leaving, ACTUALLY leaving everyone and everything we know behind, is a MAJOR thing for us. Though I come from a family who is not afraid to travel and migrate all over the world, I have not travelled extensively (moved across South Africa, yes) . My husband has travelled but only lived in one city all his life. My kids are very involved in this process of ours and I see them see-sawing between the two. It is hard to say good-bye. Especially when you choose, like us , and so many others, to keep quiet to the family until we have something concrete. Especially in a family where most members don't think that it is wise or a good thing to migrate/emigrate.

Yesterday my 5-year old was home sick. He got quiet for a long time, and when I checked on him, he had drawn chalk crosses over all the  furniture, walls, floors, pavement. "Why?", I asked perplexed. "So that we are protected against the bad guys who want to hurt us, mom" he said matter of factly. Last night my husband got an email, a potential employer wants a skype interview. We are living in hope!

SA Going to NZ Advice Forum

Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2013, 07:06:28 am »

Offline grayburg

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2013, 01:37:56 am »
I emigrated to NZ in 2003 so feel the need to wade into this.... I think people should clarify 2 aspects of the migration experience - the factual side of employment market (still prone to personal experience but reality nevertheless) and economy etc.. and the emotional side. They may be part of the same process but they are vastly different sides of a coin. To say NZ is not paradise based on the emotional tearing from family and friends and the security of familiar surroundings is not fair to NZ I think. I miss my mom and siblings terribly but have weighed that up against my kids (and now grandkids) being able to enjoy walks on the beach at dawn or dusk. Sure is closer to paradise from that aspect but doesn't lessen the pain of missing family.

Offline zatexnz

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2013, 12:15:28 pm »
Vulpes, I think your original post was very good.  I've been out of South Africa for 15 years, and only in NZ for 6, and there are still times that I miss certain things about SA.

I think what you are trying to say to those still making the decision, is that one needs to have a balanced view on this.  And to know that there could very well be some major hurdles ahead to overcome, and that one needs to not have your expectations so high, that you are disappointed.  I honestly don't think that there is a country in the world that can be called Paradise (although NZ comes close  ;) ). 

The realities of immigration are often not spoken of a lot, because people don't want to face the fact that things could be hard, could be difficult, could go wrong. 
I know of two families that came here and have had to return, because their circumstances and skills did not allow them to get PR.  This was really hard for both families.  For the one family, they've been here for 6 years on Work visas, and were denied PR. THey then, on bad advice, applied for refugee status, which has obviously been denied (you can't live here for 6 years, and THEN apply for refugee status).  When you are denied refugee status, (apparently), you are not allowed to return to this country ever!  I have not verified this yet, but this is what one member of the family told me, and it was too late to withdraw their application.  So now they HAVE to return to SA, and will never be allowed back.  That's hard.  For them,  NZ will be but a dream of paradise. 

So it's really important to do your homework.  If you don't have the skills that NZ needs, and you're really wanting to get out of SA, then perhaps you need to aquire some new skills that they DO need.  This may take time.

Coming back to the actual settling in, once you're here.  As others have said, it is a lot about attitude.  You can't go to another country and try to "recreate" your home country.  NZ is not SA.  So you'll do better not to try and find Jik and Close-up.  But to make friends with the Kiwis and ask them what product is the best for this or that use.  One of my Kiwi friends one day invited me to go shopping with her, and she pointed out products that she believed were the best for different uses.  That was probably the best "gift" anybody could have given me.  That said, I have to admit that coming to NZ was in some ways a lot easier (where products are concerned), than to the USA, because at least here one gets a lot of things that are originally from the UK as are those in SA.  So there is a lot more similarity to SA life here, but you only recognize that, if you've lived in another country inbetween. 


lekker sweet as, y'all
~ Colleen

Offline Siouxzee

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2013, 04:52:12 am »
Vulpes, 2GatJakkels great posts and completely agree

For me Paradise means perfection, so I guess you could say Heaven if you believe in it.

I dont believe any country in the world is paradise/Heaven. That would mean you never disagree with anything and nothing can be improved.

Yes we love NZ, glad we made the move and it was definitely all worth it. We are contemplating even forgoing our SA passports in a few years when it comes to getting Citizenship especially as by the end of the year we will have 2 Kiwi Citizens by birth. (obviously that is a whole other discussion)

However is not perfect and there are things that can be improved. I don't agree with all the political decisions that get made or suggested, or sometimes how the justice system seems to work. I think the media here make mountains out of molehills. I miss Woolies and still feel that alot of items and food stuffs are over priced.

In the great scheme of things if that is all we have to complain about then we are definitely on a good wicket and Life is good. We also live a very good life.

However it is not paradise and maybe it would be boring if it is was :) So definitely come with your eyes open and in the right frame of mind. Set your expectations. It is all about Pros and Cons, and what Cons you are prepared to live with, as every country does have them. Plenty of people still view SA as "paradise" as for them the Cons are not that bad - crazy I know.
EOI Submission - December 2010
EOI Selected - December 2010
ITA Received - December 2010
Awaiting Police Clearance
ITA Submitted - 03 March 2011
PR Interview - 15 March 2011
PR Approved - 18 March 2011
Passports sent and then received back - 30 March 2011
Arrive in NZ - 19 June 2011

Offline Siouxzee

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2013, 06:08:46 am »
Found this article not saying I agree or disagree but just someone giving a view on some Pros and Cons http://www.enz.org/shades-of-new-zealand.html
EOI Submission - December 2010
EOI Selected - December 2010
ITA Received - December 2010
Awaiting Police Clearance
ITA Submitted - 03 March 2011
PR Interview - 15 March 2011
PR Approved - 18 March 2011
Passports sent and then received back - 30 March 2011
Arrive in NZ - 19 June 2011

Offline Adviser

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Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2013, 02:46:06 am »
Just a thought... Don't immigrate keeping tourist image of the country in your mind think about routine way of life before making that decision such as job, taxes, crime, education and etc. it will make it easier.
I am a licensed immigration adviser in real life. I do love what I do and how I do it. Peace!!!

SA Going to NZ Advice Forum

Re: New Zealand is Not Paradise
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2013, 02:46:06 am »