Advice and Support for South Africans Immigrating to New Zealand

South Africans Going To New Zealand

Author Topic: Article in Rapport  (Read 6925 times)

greenfamily

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Article in Rapport
« on: March 04, 2007, 02:12:13 pm »
Herewith article in Rapport to stimulate discussion:
 




Marenet Jordaan
Pretoria


Wagte wat selfone en whisky aan gevangenes verkoop. Onderwysers wat kleuters aanrand – en ’n moordenaar wat tydens sy ont- snapping ’n bloedspoor agterlaat.

Dit klink dalk soos net nog ’n dag in Suid-Afrika, maar dis voorvalle in Nieu-Seeland waaroor die afgelope drie maande in koerante daar berig is.

Prof. Evert van Dijk, ’n afgetrede ekonomie-dosent van Pretoria, sê ’n verwronge boodskap word aan Suid- Afrikaners oorgedra oor hoeveel beter dit kwansuis gaan met mense wat emigreer.

Hy en sy vrou, Delia, het van Novemver verlede jaar tot Januarie in Auckland, Nieu-Seeland, gebly om die redes te bestudeer waarom mense daarheen geëmigreer het en wat hul lewensomstandighede nou is.

Hulle het onderhoude gevoer met 500 expats wie se name in die telefoongids is.

Van Dijk sê hulle was verbaas om te sien daar is 22 Bothas, 11 Van der Merwes en 10 Pieterses in Auckland se foongids.

Volgens hom noem die meeste mense die misdaadsituasie hier en die hoop op ’n beter toekoms vir hul kinders as hul motivering vir emigrasie.

Daar woon tans sowat 50 000 Suid-Afrikaners in Nieu- Seeland en 200 000 in Australië. Van Dijk se oudste seun ook.

“Jy kan nie veralgemeen en sê alles is wonderlik nie,” sê Van Dijk. Hy het veral sy mes in vir mense wat briewe met lofbetuigings oor hul nuwe tuistes na plaaslike koerante stuur.

“Baie mense probeer dit regverdig dat hulle brûe hier afgebrand het.”

Van Dijk glo byvoorbeeld nie mense wat vertel hoe hulle “met al hul vensters en deure oop” gaan slaap nie. Voor hom lê knipsels uit ’n verskeidenheid Nieu-Seelandse koerante van die laaste paar maande. Die opskrifte skree moord, korrupsie en politieke skandale uit.

Hy sê volgens die jongste polisiesyfers is daar gemiddeld vyftig inbrake per week in een van Auckland se oostelike voorstede. Drie buitelandse toeriste is onlangs binne drie weke op Nieu-Seelandse strande verkrag.

Mense wat graag vertel hoeveel dollars hulle verdien, skets nie die volle prentjie nie, sê Van Dijk.

“Jy kan nie ’n direkte vergelyking tref tussen dollars en rande nie.” Hy sê ’n basiese drieslaapkamerhuis in Auckland sal ’n mens tussen R1,5 mil-joen en R2 mijoen uit die sak jaag.

Volgens hom kry baie hooggeskoolde mense nie werk nie, ondanks beloftes van familielede wat geëmigreer het. Hy weet van ’n siviele ingenieur wat as ’n kaartjie- ondersoeker in ’n trein werk.

Volgens hom sukkel Suid-Afri- kaanse kinders ook om in openbare skole in Nieu-Seeland aan te pas. “Ons praat ’n heel ander Engels as hulle. Ek verstaan glad nie daardie twang nie.”

Hy beweer ook immigrante se kinders gaan gebuk onder text bullying – beledigende SMS-bood- skappe. Dwelmhandel in skole is ook ’n groot probleem.



 
cle in Rapport to stimulate discussion;
« Last Edit: March 04, 2007, 09:39:52 pm by zatexnz »

Offline zatexnz

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2007, 09:56:49 pm »
There is no perfect country on this earth.   In every country that you go to, there are areas that have crime.  Some worse than others.  This guy is talking about one city.  Not the whole country.  And yes, Auckland, because it is the most prosperous city, is also the obvious place where crime will be most prominent.  But one doesn't walk around with the perpetual fear that one does in South Africa.  The difference in burglaries, is that those burgled only lose some material things, whereas in South Africa, you're lucky to survive!
lekker sweet as, y'all
~ Colleen

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2007, 09:56:49 pm »

Offline tg@zerozone.co.za

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2007, 07:20:07 am »
I found this article stinking with subjectiveness and negativity. I agree that there is no perfect country out there, but this article does not seem to be objective in any manner and it sounds like this guy made a mission of it to go and take out all the negativity of NZ (which there are) and combined it into one article. Excuse my language, but who gives a *** if the warders are selling whiskey to the inmates at the end of the day.

If someone can not say one positive thing about a country, South Africa included, then it does not make sense to me. Even this country which we are leaving (SA) has some positive things you can say about it.

There is also not enough information in the article as well as FACTS. What about the Civil engineer that does not get work there apparantly? How old is he? How much money does he want? What is his situation? Same with drugs in schools, here you got rape, murder, attempted murder and drugs at schools. Which is better of then at the end of the day? Kids go to school here with un-license firearms (resent story in the news paper) to sort out fellow students.

I'm sorry, this article is just not enough proof to me of anything and it seems it was written by a RETIRED old professor who is probably sitting with a problem of severe constipation.

Regards,
TG

Offline Happy Expat

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2007, 07:45:27 am »
There is always some sad person that has nothing better to do??
I'm in NZ and we are this very moment sitting in the lounge with all the doors and windows  through out the house wide open, because it's hot. All we will do when we go to bed is close the doors and hopeful not forget to lock them?? I bet he can't do that in SA.  >:(
« Last Edit: March 05, 2007, 08:04:40 am by Happy Expat »


Offline Nolan

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2007, 08:36:50 am »
I echo what everybody else has said. I am sure if I dig deep enough, i would find stats that "show" Dubai is a dangerous place to live. You can make any place look bad, and any place look good.

I am not even going to bother replying to specifics of his letter for one simple reason - HIS KIDS LIVE IN NZ! If NZ is such a terrible place why aren't they coming back here. I personally think that he is just upset that he can't move there and is now trying to convince himself that SA is not so bad.

Cheers Prof, I'll wave when our plane leaves to "Terrible" NZ.

Offline zatexnz

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2007, 03:51:15 pm »
Oh and Happy, I bet you don't have burglar bars in front of all the windows either!  ;)  And do you have a burglar alarm?  With panic buttons throughout the house?  I bet not!  :D
New Zealand is as close to paradise as we'll get on this side of eternity!  That's my opinion!  ::)
lekker sweet as, y'all
~ Colleen

Offline Happy Expat

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2007, 09:38:57 pm »
No bars, no alarms and my two small dogs would just jump all over you, not like my 2 well trained German Shepards I had in SA??

For SAn's this is paradise!!  :smitten:

It's so funny when you first arrive and notice how relaxed everybody is. You almost get horrified at what they are doing, but then you realise, they've had this sort of safety all thier lives??................then you cry! :'( Happy tears of course! ;D

Some things I've seen so far.

Car running while they run into the shops.
Leave kids in the car with windows wide open.
Leave baby in car while walking other child to class. (Don't agree with that?)
Leave wallet in trolley while shopping.
Woman walking out late at night.
Young kids walking and riding bikes at all sorts of times.

That's just a few?


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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2007, 09:38:57 pm »

Offline zatexnz

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2007, 10:16:17 pm »
I had been here in the States for around 6 months, and was highly pregnant at the time (found out I was pg a week before leaving SA!), and I was alone, as Jan had a job up in Dallas, while we lived here in Austin.  I needed a meal, and didn't feel like cooking for myself, and it was February, which is already dark by 8pm.  I walked across a busy street to the nearby Randalls (general grocer), for a meal from their deli.  It was on the way back that the realization hit me:  Here I am, a vulnerable pregnant woman alone in the black of night, and I HAD NO FEAR!!!  There were no loafers under the trees watching me, there was nobody acosting me outside the store for a handout.   No Fear.  It was the most freeing feeling in my life.  I've been back to SA twice now, and each time, that underlying "have-to-be-alert-at-all-times, hold-onto-your-bag-like-a-magnet" feeling came back.  I did however feel a lot more confident about life than before living in the States, and felt less fear somehow.  Like I could bash anybody to pieces who even tried to touch me or my children... perhaps it's the "mother's instinct" that had kicked in, in the meantime!
lekker sweet as, y'all
~ Colleen

Offline Happy Expat

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2007, 10:24:59 pm »
It's such a good feeling, one I wish for all SAn's.
It's one of the best rewards you can have after all the stress of immigrating. When you wonder around that first time with out fear, is just heaven!!

I would get myself into trouble if I went to SA now. I'm too relaxed. Or I would have a nervous breakdown on the first day?? :crazy2:

I miss my family, but I just don't feel like it's worth the stress? I want them to come here so that on the of chance they will love it enough to move here! :-\


Offline zatexnz

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2007, 10:37:36 pm »
I know how you feel Happy.  I'm very fortunate that both my sisters preceded me to NZ, and now my Dad too.  Only my brother is not there yet, but he's happily married in Germany.  Just heard he's gonna be a daddy for the 3rd time!  Which means they've had to postpone their trip to NZ this year.  Which suits me fine - they've decided to rather make it next year when we're there - in time to celebrate my 40th! YAYAY :D 
lekker sweet as, y'all
~ Colleen

Offline Nolan

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2007, 10:39:14 pm »
shhhhh, no giving away your age now....

Offline Happy Expat

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2007, 10:42:58 pm »
I would love my family to be here for my birthday next week?? :-\


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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2007, 10:42:58 pm »

Offline Nolan

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2007, 10:51:23 pm »
and that would be on the.......?

Offline Happy Expat

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2007, 10:53:25 pm »
..monday the 12th.


Offline almostakiwi

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Re: Article in Rapport
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2007, 06:48:07 am »
I am happy to see that things like rape, murder and corruption still make it into the newspaper.

In SA these events are so common place these days, that you only see a fraction of it in the newspaper, and when you do you turn the page to read the sports headlines.

I look forward to living in a country where people actually acknowledge when there is a problem and care enough to do something about it.